wheelchair ramp

 

Questions & Answers


I just want a ramp. Why do I need "Service"?

Do you rent ramps?

How much do ramps cost?

Where can I get financial assistance?

How long does the ramp need to be?

Can I get by with a shorter ramp?

What are the legal requirements for ramps?

What if I don't have enough room for a "long" ramp?

Can your ramps be used at condominiums or apartments?

Will a ramp detract from the value of my home?

Does RampArts do lift and elevator installations or vehicle conversions?

Does RampArts have a showroom?

Do you do other related work?

Who should know about RampArts?

What areas of Washington do you serve?



I just want a ramp. Why do I need "Service"?

The typical person who contacts us about a ramp is:

  • unfamiliar with his or her new equipment (walker, wheelchair, or scooter)
  • unsure about how steep a wheelchair ramp will be appropriate or manageable.
  • unclear about building code requirements and safety guidelines.
  • unaware of the full range of products, design strategies, and construction methods available to solve accessibility problems.

Each of our customers has unique needs, and each site presents unique challenges. Most wheelchair ramp installations require some modification or custom adaptations.

As part of our free estimate, we will:

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Do you rent ramps?

Yes. Please see our Ramp Rentals page.

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How much do ramps cost?

Short portable wheelchair ramps are available for as little as $150, while long ramps rising a full story can cost $10,000 or more. Your actual cost depends upon the type and length of ramp needed, which in turn depends on how it will be used and who will use it. A ramp is almost always more affordable than alternatives, and is cheap insurance against a fall. RampArts will always suggest the lowest cost solution, along with other options.

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Where can I get financial assistance?

If you are eighteen or older with a chronic illness or medical condition, you may be eligible for financial assistance with wheelchair ramps and many other needs. For more information contact:

ADSA (Aging and Disability Services Administration) This umbrella agency administers the sub-agencies below. Please contact one of the agencies below:

To get an overview at ADSA web site: http://www.adsa.dshs.wa.gov

Information and referral services for people 60 years and older, contact Senior Services of King County: (206) 448-3110 http://www.seniorservices.org

Any adult who may need Medicaid for care and/or home modifications such as ramps should contact: HCS (Home and Community Services) (800) 346-9257 or (206) 341-7750.

If you are a Veteran or spouse, you may be eligible for benefits even if your disability is not service-related.

For information on benefits through the United States Department of Veterans Affairs and the Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program contact: 1-800-827-1000 Click on the link below to visit their web site: http://www.vba.va.gov/bln/vre/

For local information and eligibility questions contact the VA Puget Sound Health Care System: (800) 329-8387 or (206) 762-1010 Click on the link below to visit their web site: http://www1.va.gov/directory/guide/facility.asp?ID=120&dnum=ALL&map=1

If you have a Work-Related Injury, you may be covered under Industrial Insurance. Contact the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries: (800) 547-8367 Click on the link below to visit their web site: http://www.wa.gov/lni/pa/direct.htm

Several groups offer low-interest loans and other financial options: WATF, the Washington Assistive Technology Foundation Phone: (800) 841-8345 Click on the link below to visit their web site: www.watf.org

Other Sources: Learn about a statewide network of trained volunteers who help people of all ages with questions about health insurance, health care access, and prescription access SHIBA, the Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors (800) 397-4422 http://www.insurance.wa.gov/consumers/SHIBA_HelpLine/dirdefault.asp

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How long does the ramp need to be?

ramp slope diagram

The standard slope for a wheelchair ramp is expressed as the ratio 1:12, which means you'll need one foot of length for each inch of rise. For example, if your front porch has three 7" steps (for a total rise of 21"), your ramp should be 21 feet long. Tests have determined that this is the slope which can be safely negotiated by the average person in a manual wheelchair.

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Can I get by with a shorter ramp?

Shorter wheelchair ramps (steeper than the typical 1:12 slope) MAY be suitable for some users, such as persons in scooters or power chairs, persons assisted by others, or exceptionally strong persons using a manual chair. However, such a ramp may not comply with building codes or other regulations.

Some people may need a ramp which is less steep than 1:12 (and therefore longer), such as an infirm but ambulatory person with a shuffling gait, or a person with minimal arm strength who must use a manual chair without assistance. A longer, shallower ramp is always safer for all users.

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What are the legal requirements for ramps?

The particular rules for wheelchair ramps differ between residential and commercial sites, new construction vs. remodel, temporary vs. permanent, city vs. county and other variables. However, almost all codes (and ADA guidelines) require wheelchair ramps to have:

  • A slope not to exceed 1:12 (1 inch vertical rise in 12 inches of horizontal travel)
  • Guardrails and handrails of specific dimensions
  • A slip-resistant surface
  • A level landing at the top of the ramp
  • Level landings at all turns
  • Load capacity equal to floors

Good news if you live in Seattle: local zoning codes allow access ramps to be built anywhere on your property, even in lot setback areas where other structures are prohibited.

For more information about codes and guidelines, go to: http://clerk.ci.seattle.wa.us/~public/code1.htm (http://www.mrsc.org/) http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/reg3a.html

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What if I don't have enough room for a "long" ramp?

The common wheelchair ramp configurations are straight, "L", "U", and "Z", shapes, but odd angles are no problem for RampArts. In addition, we have several other space-saving innovations, such as retractable or removable sections, bridges, and even curved ramps. Call us for more ideas. If your space can be ramped, RampArts will find a way!

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Can your ramps be used at condominiums or apartments?

Yes, our SlimLine ramp system is "landlord friendly". Apartment owners and condo associations are pleased to learn that our wheelchair ramps are safe, attractive, configured to maintain access by all tenants and are easily removable.

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Will a ramp detract from the value of my home?

Even if you need a large ramp in your front yard for several years, there is no problem. When you are ready to sell your home the SlimLine system is easily removed. With wheelchair ramps constructed of wood or concrete we have many strategies to enhance the path to your home:

  • thoughtful placement
  • blending with the style and color of the architecture
  • screening from view with privacy walls, arbors, carefully placed plantings. A well designed ramp can add functionality and beauty, increasing the value of your home.

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Does RampArts do lift and elevator installations or vehicle conversions?

No, but we may be able to help with remodeling associated with putting in a lift. Give us a call for more information.

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Does RampArts have a showroom?

No. Please see our selection of RampArts Products and call us with any questions you might have.

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Do you do other related work?

Yes. As licensed General Contractors and highly experienced remodelers, we can help you with all parts of the accessible route of travel, including sidewalks, porches, decks, patios and garden walkways.

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Who should know about RampArts?

  • Family members and friends of disabled persons
  • Assistive professionals: Occupational Therapists/ Discharge Planners/ Case Managers
  • End Users: Disabled persons/ Elderly
  • Service Groups: Advocacy Associations/ Philanthropists/ Easter Seals/ MS Society/ Senior Centers/ Etc.
  • Government Offices: WATA/ L&I/ VA/ Division of Vocational Rehab/ Etc.
  • Related Businesses: Medical Equipment Vendors
  • Pet Owners: Can your larger pets with medical conditions or advanced age get in and out of the house or vehicles?
  •   

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What areas of Washington do you serve?

Most of our clients live in the counties that border on Puget Sound: King, Snohomish, Kitsap and Pierce. We are a licensed and bonded General Contractor in the State of Washington. Past installations include clients in the communities of Toppenish, Wenatchee, Spokane, Montesano and Darrington.

We have recently helped clients with wheelchair ramp and accessibility needs in:

  • Seattle
  • Tacoma
  • Bremerton
  • Everett
  • Bellevue
  • Edmonds
  • Shelton
  • Renton
  • Kent
  • Des Moines
  • Bothell
  • Kirkland
  • Lake Forest Park
  • North Bend
  • Monroe
  • Olympia
  • Mountlake Terrace
  • Woodinville
  • Lynnwood
  • Federal Way
  • Shoreline
  • Port Orchard

and more...

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